First flowers of 2016 and composting hack

At the farm yesterday, we spotted the first signs of spring!!

I have no idea what those little flowers are. I really need a book on Texas wildflowers and native grasses. If you have a book you like, please send along the recommendation!

And I planted my first small plants in the hugelkultur bed!

These are onion starts – I bought a bundle of 25 or so at a local feed store and split them between my RV park garden, the hugelkultur bed, and a new idea.

I’ve been having a problem that I think I solved yesterday. Let me explain.

No, that would take too long. Let me sum up.

I have been saving food scraps to compost. Since we live in an RV park it’s not practical or neighborly to start a compost heap here. I have a composting bin at my MIL’s house, but it’s not really animal proof. I thought putting the food scraps in the hugelkultur beds would help with their fertility, but it just attracted animals that dug up the newly placed soil to get the apple cores and banana peels.

So there was my problem; I didn’t want to throw away food scraps that could be used for improving our awful soil but I didn’t want to encourage wild animals to help themselves to everything in my garden.

At the farm conference last week, a couple ideas stuck in my head, and together they brewed up a solution to my problem. First, any bare soil on your farm needs to be addressed. Bare soil won’t soak up rain or sink carbon, and just isn’t producing anything at all, much less anything valuable. Second, the goal of everything you do on your farm should be to 1) make money and 2) increase the fertility of the earth.

With those ideas in mind, I came up with a plan. I found the worst patch of dirt on the farm. It was where we had a couple bonfires before we put the fire ring in place. The soil was bare and scorched. It wouldn’t absorb more than about a quart of water. And when I dug it up, there was ZERO insect life in the soil. It was dead, dead, dead.

I dug six inches down and dumped a week’s worth of compostable food scraps in. Banana peels, egg shells, old bread, etc.

Then I filled it back in, taking care to crumble the very dense clay into smaller clods.

And I put the rest of my onion starts in the soil on top. I think the view alone will encourage them to grow nicely!

I’m really excited about this idea. It solves many problems all at once. The next few months I’m going to concentrate on planting patches of wildflowers all around the farm to attract bees and butterflies.

In other news, Andrew got paint samples and my mother in law did a corner of one of the containers for the building. Oh my gosh, I love it! The main greenish color blends in beautifully with the landscape, and the brown trim sets it off so nicely. It’s going to look so…RIGHT.

Yesterday was WINDY. 20-30 mph constantly, all day. It wasn’t too fun, but hey. It’s our farm. I’ve not had a bad day there yet, windy or not.

Next week: we pour concrete to finish the foundation for the container building!

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